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29/11/2021 07:46am

Special Constabulary Long Service Medal

History
 
The Special Constabulary Long Service Medal was instituted in August 1919. The medal was initially called the Special Constabulary Medal. The intent of the original warrant was to recognize the service of the members of the Special Constabulary during World War I, with further regulations to recognize nine years of service as a member of the Special Constabulary.
 
However, a new Royal Warrant was issued in 1920 changing the name of the medal to the Special Constabulary Long Service Medal.
 
The Special Constabulary Long Service Medal may be awarded under one of four different sets of criteria, these being:-
 
Great War Service - Special Constables who served without pay during World War I from 1914-1918 for three years, and performed at least 150 police duties were eligible to be awarded the medal. Recipients who received the medal under these conditions were entitled to a clasp to their medal denoting World War I service.
 
Special Constabulary - The medal may be awarded to Special Constables who are recommended by the Chief Officer of Police of the department in which they serve so long as they have served without pay for at least nine years, and willingly and competently discharged their duty as a Special Constable. Years of service during World War I from 1914 to 1918 and service during World War II from 3 September 1939 to 31 December 1945 are counted as triple.
 
Special Constables who complete an additional period of ten years service are eligible for a clasp to the medal, upon the recommendation of the Chief Officer of Police.
 
Ulster Special Constabulary - Members of the Ulster Special Constabulary were eligible for award of the medal after fifteen years of service where they willingly and competently discharged their duty. Members who were serving their fifteenth year on 30 April 1970, the date the Ulster Special Constabulary was disbanded, were also eligible for award of the medal. Eligible individuals must have been recommended for award by the Chief Officer of Police, Royal Ulster Constabulary.
 
Special Constables who complete an additional period of ten years service are eligible for a clasp to the medal, upon the recommendation of the Chief Officer of Police. Members of the Ulster Special Constabulary who were in at least the ninth year of a subsequent ten year period of service on 30 April 1970 were eligible for award of a clasp.
 
Royal Ulster Constabulary Reserve - The medal may be awarded to members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary Reserve upon the recommendation of the Chief Constable, Royal Ulster Constabulary, who served fifteen years and willingly and competently discharged their duty as a member of the RUC Reserve. Service in the Ulster Special Constabulary which was not counted for the award of the medal or bar, may be counted with service as a member of the RUC Reserve.
 
Special Constables who complete an additional period of ten years service are eligible for a clasp to the medal, upon the recommendation of the Chief Officer of Police.
 
Description
 
The medal is circular, 36mm in diameter and was struck in bronze. The obverse of this medal bears the effigy of the reigning sovereign.
 
The reverse bears the inscription; ‘FOR | FAITHFUL | SERVICE | IN THE | SPECIAL | CONSTABULARY’ across six lines.
 
In 1956 a different reverse was created for the Ulster Special Constabulary with the inscription; ‘‘FOR | FAITHFUL | SERVICE | IN THE | ULSTER | SPECIAL | CONSTABULARY’ across seven lines.
 
This in turn was modified in 1982 to recognise the Royal Ulster Constabulary Reserve.
 
The ribbon suspender is of the plain, straight and swivelling style either riveted to the medal or attached by a fastening that surmounts the medal.
 
The recipient's details can be found on the medal's rim impressed in capital letters.
 
Ribbon
 
Special Constabulary Long Service Medal.png
 
The ribbon is 32mm wide with a red centre stripe and white stripes bisected by an equal black stripe at either edge.
 
Bars/Clasps
 
The first clasp to the medal was created upon the establishment of the medal which denoted that the medal was awarded for service during World War I. This bronze clasp bears the inscription; ‘THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918’.
 
From in 1929, subsequent awards could be recognized by a clasp engraved with the words; ‘LONG SERVICE’.
 
Recipients who are entitled to a clasp to the medal may wear a silver rosette on the service ribbon when the medal is not worn.
 
Further relevant historical context can be found at the foot of this entry.
 
Dealer Retail Value *
 
Special Constabulary LS Medal George V issue
£25.00
As above with The Great War clasp
£35.00
Special Constabulary LS Medal George VI issue
£25.00
Special Constabulary LS Medal Elizabeth II issue
£65.00
As above Northern Ireland issue
£195.00
For valuations for medals with a second bar award please ‘contact us’.
 
* It should be noted that the values quoted above reflect the average price that a medal dealer may expect to sell this medal for - please see the ‘things you should know’ web page for more details about valuing medals.
 
Further Historical Context
 
This section contains information on the following:-
 
- The Special Constabulary.
 
The Special Constabulary - The Special Constabulary is the part-time volunteer section of statutory police forces in the United Kingdom and some Crown dependencies. Its officers are known as special constables (all hold the office of constable no matter what their rank) or informally as specials.
 
Every United Kingdom territorial police force has a special constabulary except the Police Service of Northern Ireland, which has a Reserve constituted on different grounds. However, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (and previously the Royal Irish Constabulary) did have its own Ulster Special Constabulary from 1920 until 1970, when the Reserve was formed.
 
The British Transport Police (a 'special police force') also has a special constabulary. In the Crown dependencies, the Isle of Man Constabulary and the States of Guernsey Police Service also have special constabularies, but the States of Jersey Police does not.
 
The strength of the special constabulary as of 31 March 2010 in England and Wales was 15,505 and 1,653 in Scotland.
 
Special constables are not the same as police community support officers (PCSOs), who are employed by police forces to provide operational support to regular officers. Special constables usually work for a minimum of 16/25 hours per month (depending on the force - the national minimum is 16 hours), although many do considerably more.
 
Special constables might receive some expenses and allowances from the police service, including a £1,100 'recognition award' in Scotland and some forces in England, but their work is otherwise voluntary and unpaid.
 
Special constables have identical powers to their regular (full-time) colleagues and work alongside regular police officers, but most special constabularies in England and Wales have their own organisational structure and grading system, which varies from force to force. Special constabularies are headed by a commandant or chief officer, who are themselves special constables.
 
Within Scotland, a number of forces in England and Wales, and the British Transport Police, special constables have no separate administrative structure and no grading system.
 
This information was taken from ‘Wikipedia’. The original article and details of the authors can be found here. It is reproduced on this web-site under the ‘creative commons’ licence which can be found here.