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29/11/2021 08:30am

Air Efficiency Award

History
 
The Air Efficiency Award was instituted in 1942. The medal was presented to all ranks and was awarded for 10 years’ efficient service in the Reserve Air Forces of the United Kingdom, Empire and Commonwealth.
 
For those personnel whose service commenced before 3 September 1939, in the Territorial Service of the Air Force Reserve, the time was counted as time and a half. Service with the Royal Air Force or any other Commonwealth Air Force during World War II between 3 September 1939 and 2 September 1945, was counted treble time.
 
Service, other than in Flying duties in the Territorial Air Force or the Air Force Reserve was normally counted as single time, but when embodied within the Royal Air Force or any Commonwealth Air Force during the Second World War, this was counted as double time.
 
Any other service within the Royal Air Force or any Commonwealth Air Force during the Second World War was counted as single time. Personnel that also served within World War I in a regular force was counted as single time and during that period service in non-regular forces was counted as double time. Service in non-regular forces after World War I prior to 3 September 1939 was also counted as single time.
 
Time that was counted for which the serviceman already received another Long Service or Good Conduct Medal, could not be counted for receiving the Air Efficiency Award.
 
The qualifying period had to be continuously, with the exception of service during World War II. A break of six months in the period after World War II was accepted under certain conditions.
 
Bars were awarded to recognise further periods of 10 years’ qualifying service.
 
Whilst both officers and enlisted men were eligible for this award, however, only officers who had been presented with the award were allowed the use of the post nominal letters ‘AE’.
 
The award was discontinued in April 1999, and replaced by the Volunteer Reserves Service Medal.
 
Description
 
The medal is oval, 32mm wide and 38mm in height and was struck in silver. The obverse of this medal bears the effigy of the reigning monarch at the time that the medal was issued and a corresponding inscription. Three versions of the decoration have been awarded, this is summarised in the table below:-
 
Monarch
Issue & Type
Obverse Style & Inscription
Dates
George VI
1
GVI 1
Un-crowned coinage effigy of the King, facing left
GEORGIVS VI D: G: BR: OMN: REX F:D: IND: IMP.
1937 - 1948
George VI
2
GVI 2
Un-crowned coinage effigy of the King, facing left
GEORGIVS VI D: G: BRITT: OMN: REX FID: DEF:
1949 - 1952
Elizabeth II
3
E:R I
Un-crowned effigy of the Queen, facing right
ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA F.D.
1953 - 1999
 
The reverse is plain with the inscription; ‘AIR EFFICIENCY AWARD’ in large letters.
 
The ribbon suspender is fixed and in the form of an eagle with its wings spread riveted to the medal..
 
The recipient's details can be found impressed on the medal's rim.
 
Ribbon
 
 
The ribbon is 38mm wide and is green in colour with two thin white stripes towards the centre.
 
Bars/Clasps
 
Bars bearing a Royal crown are awarded in recognition of periods of further qualifying lengths of service.
 
In undress uniform or on occasions when the medal ribbon alone is worn, a silver rosette is worn on the ribbon to indicate each bar.
 
Further relevant historical context can be found at the foot of this entry.
 
Dealer Retail Value */**
 
George VI 1st issue
£135.00
George VI 2nd issue
£165.00
Elizabeth II issue
£135.00
 
* It should be noted that the values quoted above reflect the average price that a medal dealer may expect to sell this medal for - please see the ‘things you should know’ web page for more details about valuing medals.
 
** The individual medal value will vary considerably based on the recipient’s details.
 
Further Historical Context
 
This section contains information on the following:-
 
- The Royal Auxiliary Air Force.
 
The Royal Auxiliary Air Force - The Royal Auxiliary Air Force (RAuxAF), originally the Auxiliary Air Force (AAF), is the voluntary active duty reserve element of the Royal Air Force, providing a primary reinforcement capability for the regular service.
 
It consists of paid volunteers who give up some of their weekends, evenings and holidays to train at one of a number of squadrons around the United Kingdom. Its current mission is to provide trained personnel in support of the RAF.
 
This information was taken from ‘Wikipedia’. The original article and details of the authors can be found here. It is reproduced on this web-site under the ‘creative commons’ licence which can be found here.
 
End of database.